The Co-operative Societies' Ordinance of 1924 came into effect, which allowed organisations to register and operate as co-operative thrift and loan societies.

On 18 August, the Sharikat Polis Repablik Singapura Bekerja Sama-Sama Jimat Chermat, Menyimpan Dan Pinjaman Wang Dengan Tanggongan Berhad or the Singapore Police Co-operative Thrift and Loan Society (SPCTLS) was formally registered with the Registrar of Co-operative Societies for the Straits Settlements and the Federated Malay States.

A First for Uniformed Personnel

The first co-operative society to be registered for uniformed personnel in the Singapore Government Service.

8th Annual General Meeting of SPCTLS

Preside over by Society Patron, Mr H. Fairburn, Inspector General of Police, membership was listed as 1,700 and the Society claimed to have S$150,000 available in capital accounts.

Singapore surrendered to the Japanese; all co-operative societies ceased operations during the Occupation. The Japanese Occupation ended in 1945; civil government restored in April 1946.

Headed by the First Welfare Officer of the Singapore Police, ASP H. Hall, Police Co-op officially registered and began operations.

By 1949, the Co-op increased from 1,956 to 2,347 members.

Police Co-op launched this fund to aid the children of members who were killed in action during the Malayan Emergency or who were otherwise incapacitated and invalided out of the service.

Police Co-op presented 197 education scholarship awards to children of Society members at a special ceremony at the Police Training School.

Relocation of Police Co-op to Hill Street

Police Co-op moved to Hill Street Police Station and Barracks along with the Police Welfare Division.

Opening of First Police Co-op Store

The Kinloss Retail Shop was named after its initial location in the Kinloss House (next to former Ladyhill Hotel) located near No. 3 Lady Hill Road.

Relocation of Police Coop to Lady Hill Road

The Co-operative moved to No. 3 Lady Hill Road, the site of the Kinloss House, which would lend its name to the Co-operative’s Kinloss Retail Shop.

The Singapore Police Thrift & Loan Society was renamed the Singapore Police Multi-Purpose Co-operative Society Ltd. Premier Security Co-operative Society Ltd, a joint venture between Police Coop and the Singapore Government Servants’ Co-operative Thrift and Loan Society Ltd (currently known as The Singapore Government Staff Credit Co-operative Society Ltd), was formed.

Establishment of Premier Security Co-operative Ltd

Premier Security Co-operative Ltd was established as a joint venture between Police Co-op and The Singapore Government Staff Credit Co-operative Society Ltd, Premier Security sets a high bar for both the co-operative movement and the security industry in Singapore.

Implementation of GIRO Scheme

The Society successfully negotiated with Overseas Union Bank (OUB) to implement the General Interbank Recurring Order (GIRO) Scheme for Society members.

Launch of Fixed Deposit Scheme

The Fixed Deposit Scheme was launched.

Purchase of Hua Bao Building

Police Co-op purchased the six-storey Hua Bao Building at 21 Middle Road.

Establishment of SECOM

The Society became a shareholder of SECOM (Singapore) Pte Ltd, a security management firm. SECOM provides comprehensive security management services to corporate clients looking for professional, reliable, and effective security solutions.

Renaming of Society to Singapore Police Cooperative Society Ltd

The Singapore Multi-Purpose Co-operative Society Ltd was renamed the Singapore Police Co-operative Society Limited.

Police Co-op was awarded a Commendation Plaque by the Singapore National Co-operative Federation Ltd for its reputation as a progressive Society and its on-going contributions to the cooperative society movement in Singapore.

Singapore Police Cooperative Club Formed

The Singapore Police Co-operative Club was formed and opened at 21 Middle Road.

Launch of Police Co-op's Website and New Logo

The launch of the Co-operative’s new logo. The first version of the dedicated website for Police Co-op was launched, which marked the Co-operatives first venture into cyber-space.

In December, Choice Decor Co-operative Society Ltd was registered, specializing in interior design, contract services and renovation works.

Purchase of 259 & 261 Holland Avenue

Police Co-op purchased two shop units located at Holland Avenue

Purchase of 81 Club Street Conservation Shophouse

A conservation shophouse at 81 Club Street, believed to be the oldest structure along this street, was added to the portfolio.

Launch of Automated Interactive Voice Response System

First use of an automated Interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) which allowed members round-the-clock access to information on their accounts.

Purchase of 3 Strata Floors at Sims Avenue

The Co-operative added three strata-floors of the SK Building at 250 Sims Avenue to its portfolio of properties

Choice Decor Official Opening

In January, Choice Decor held their official opening at Block 22, Sin Ming Road, 01-232.

Relocation of the Society

After the renaming of the SPCS Building, the Co-operative moved its operations on 18 February 2004 from Middle Road to the former SK Building at Sims Avenue.

The Co-operative announced a success of Members' Fund crossing the $100 million threshold, a big accomplishment.

Incorporation of SPCS Consultancy Pte Ltd

SPCS Consultancy Pte Ltd, a joint venture with SECOM (Singapore) Pte Ltd, was incorporated on 27 July 2006

Purchase of 2 Commercial Units at Guthrie Building

The Co-operative purchased two commercial units at Guthrie Building, 150 Changi Road.

Commemoration of 85th Anniversary

85th Anniversary of The Singapore Police Co-operative Society Limited.

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Inception of The Singapore Police Co-operative Society

The Singapore Police Co-operative Society Ltd (SPCS) was launched on 18th August 1926 as the first co-operative for uniformed personnel in the Singapore Government Service. Since its inception, SPCS serves the uniformed and civilian staff of law enforcement agencies by offering support and care to members in meaningful and pragmatic ways, especially in the area of financial assistance. It is an institution with strong and sound financial fundamental and investments that offer many benefits for its members. SPCS is a social enterprise owned by its members, thus the Co-operative’s mission is tailored to best serve the needs of the members. The Co-operative is based on the International Co-operative Alliance’s Rochdale Principles of Co-operation.

Members voting at the 1991 Annual General Meeting

The Guiding Principle for The Singapore Police Co-operative Society Limited

The Rochdale Co-op founded in 1844 was the first co-operative registered in the world. It laid down the principles of running a successful co-operative. The original Rochdale Principles were officially adopted by the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA), a worldwide co-operative union, in 1937 as the Rochdale Principles of Co-operation.

In 1995, the Co-operative Principles were adopted as part of the Statement on the Co-operative Identity when the International Co-operative Alliance celebrated its 100th Anniversary.

Toad Lane Store – the first retail Co-operative of “The Rochdale Pioneers” founded in 1844. It is now the Rochdale Pioneers Museum.

The Rochdale Principles

The Rochdale Pioneers are recognised throughout the world as the founders of the modern co-operative movement. Source: Rochdale Pioneers Museum / National Co-operative Archive.

Open Membership

A co-operative does not discriminate. Anyone willing to participate may do so. The co-operative can set ground rules for membership, so long as all persons meeting such criteria are able to join the co-operative if they so choose.

Democratic Control

According to the ICA’s Statement on the Co-operative Identity, “Co-operatives are democratic organisations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting their own policies and making decisions. Men and women serving as elected representatives are accountable to the membership.”

Limited Return on Capital

A co-operative is not intended to be a money-making enterprise for its members. Members may thus be paid only a limited amount of interest on any money they invest. This is why most co-operatives have a very modest initial investment requirement.

Surplus Belongs to Members

Since the co-operative members are also the owners, they receive any profit the co-operative makes from normal operations. In many co-operatives, the profits are reinvested into the business or other business-owned investments.

Honest Business Practices

According to the ICA’s Statement on the Co-operative Identity, “Co-operatives are autonomous, self-help organisations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organisations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their co-operative autonomy.”

Education

Another of the Rochdale Principles states that co-operative societies must provide education and training for their members and the public. According to the ICA’s Statement on the Co-operative Identity, “Co-operatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their co-operatives. They should also inform the general public – particularly young people and opinion leaders – about the nature and benefits of co-operation.”

Co-operation among Co-operatives

Co-operation among individual co-operative societies is an important aspect of keeping co-operatives alive in a commercial, consumer-driven world economy. According to the ICA’s Statement on the Co-operative Identity, “Co-operatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the co-operative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.”

Arrival of members at the 2006 Annual General Meeting.

Although different co-operatives from around the world use slightly different sets of principles, this brief outline helps to explain the working rationale of The Singapore Police Co-operative Society (SPCS), which follows each of the above principles in both theory and practice.